Tag Archives: Fun

You are NOT a Software Engineer!

I enjoyed You are NOT a Software Engineer! by Chris Aitchison. It’s a fun analogy. Writing software certainly does feel more like something roughly planned and growing organically or evolving rather than something perfectly specified and executed. And I think this is OK.

Another thing we coders often forget: we are also authors. We write code for humans (others and our future selves) to read. I want you to be stoked when you read what I write! And coding is writing.

Wanted: Simple 2D Game Framework

ab_dI want to write a simple kid’s game. It would show something like “A B _ D”, then speak “What letter is missing?”. If you hit the “c” key, it would say “Congratulations!”. If you hit any other key, “Try again!”.

Anyone have pointers on game-creation frameworks? I’m looking for something cross-platform and very high-level. I want to be able to write and play the game in a few hours max.

These look hopeful: ScratchLÖVE, RacketAlice, Pygame.

I want this crawl version to be as simple as possible. Eventually I might want to add score tracking and animations.

I could also create a web-based game that would work, say, in a web browser on an iPad, but this smells a bit more complex than I’m hoping for right now.

Here are a couple other related links I came across while poking around:

Science Fiction

I like Science Fiction because it scares me. It opens my mind to new ideas.

And sometimes the fiction becomes reality.

Just the other day I finished Robopocalypse (a great read!). Today I thumb through my news feed and hear that California just joined a couple other states in legalizing self-driving cars and Toyota continues to make progress with domestic helper robots.

I don’t see the singularity coming any time soon, but it’s easy to see our tools evolving rapidly. Our responsibility towards each other must grow commensurate with the evolution of our tools.

Amped is great so far, too. I just happened to watch The Hunted lately, which also explores the theme of technology-enhanced individuals being rejected by mainstream society. Like Dr. Steve Mann’s beating in France. Discrimination is certainly old news; I believe we love the familiar, and it follows the unfamiliar generally is harder to accept. But this challenge is exactly what makes the unfamiliar awesome.

Wanted: fair curated tweet list

I think I like Twitter. I’m getting to like it, anyway. One problem I have with it is what appears to be an overwhelming emphasis on timely and copious posting.

I often miss tweets from my VIPs (friends, family), especially those who post infrequently. I want something that shows me the last few tweets for a list of people I specify.

Twitter’s “lists” feature comes close to this goal, but (like every other Twitter client I’ve seen) it shows every tweet and the most recent first, so infrequent tweeters are still penalized.

What would really unlock this problem for me is if there existed a REST API to pull a few tweets from several users at once. Anyone know if such a thing exists?

I’m also interested to know if there’s an extant client that does what I’m describing. I wouldn’t mind not coding this.

UPDATE (30 minutes later):

I cobbled something together that basically does what I want. I only slightly modified Kevin Liew’s dead-simple jQuery-based example to make my app. I just factored out the user parameter to JQTWEET.loadTweets() and now call it multiple times, once per VIP. Even with a list of 50 VIPs I can run this less than once per hour and still avoid rate limits.

UPDATE (2012-09-27):

Another idea, no coding required: subscribe to the RSS feeds for each VIP in your favorite feed reader.

3 Reasons Why You Should Never Use Enlocked

Enlocked advertises easy, secure email. Sounds good to me! My current solution (Thunderbird+Enigmail) works, barely, but it is a big pain in the tukhus. I’d go for something better. Heck, I’d pay for it. And Enlocked is free!

I gave their Chrome plugin a try. Installation was a breeze and it worked exactly as advertised. It integrates almost seamlessly into GMail (when replying, quoted text is still encrypted, but they’ll probably fix that soon). It really was friendly enough for anyone! But I’m not dusting off the old blog just to tell you that. No ma’am.

Unicorn and Cow (and sentry)

1. They encrypt and decrypt using their own key.

If you’ve ever spent the not-insignificant time to learn and use PGP yourself, you’ll know that one point of going through all the trouble is complete, end-to-end encryption. You don’t have to trust your email handlers. Any of them. And there can be many! So, uh, you just never give your private key to anyone, ok? Everyone gets their own keys (there are plenty for everyone, and they’re free!). That’s the way PGP works.

I should say that I’m not positive Enlocked uses their own key. It could just be a key they generate using some secret they securely get through you via OpenID or something fancy like that (even so, they’re free to brute force your secret day and night since they have the key). But without knowing for sure, you might as well assume it’s their key and they can decrypt your messages anytime they darn well please. Or if someone forces them to decrypt messages (like a government, or someone with lots of power or money), same result.

2. They encrypt and decrypt on their servers.

From their How it Works page:

The systems at Enlocked only have access to your messages for the short time we are encrypting or decrypting them, and then our software instantly removes any copies.

This is really more of the first reason (no end-to-end encryption), but it’s just another place where their inevitable security breach could occur.

3. Their software is closed-source.

If you know me you know I’m a Free² Software zealot, so you expect this kind of propaganda from me. But transparency is really important where the actual encryption and decryption takes place. They must at least make their client-side code available for review.

Sorry Enlocked, nobody serious about security will adopt your software until you address these issues.

Disclaimer: I’m no security expert. But Bruce Schneier is. If you really want to get schooled on security, read anything he’s written. For instance: Secrets and Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World.

Auto-update bind 9 zone database serial numbers

This post is helpful for configuring emacs to automatically update the “Serial” in bind zone databases. I wanted to do the same in Vim, but the solutions in the comments of that post didn’t work for me. Here’s a version that does. It’s yours for free under the Affero GPL v3 (or any later version, at your preference):

function s:BindZoneSettings()
    function s:UpdateBindZoneSerial(date, num)
        if (strftime("%Y%m%d") == a:date)
            return a:date . a:num+1
        endif
        return strftime("%Y%m%d") . '01'
    endfunction
 
    function s:ReplaceBindZoneSerialLine()
        :%s/\(2[0-9]\{7}\)\([0-9]\{2}\)\(\s*;\s*Serial\)/\=UpdateBindZoneSerial(submatch(1), submatch(2)) . submatch(3)/g
    endfunction
 
    autocmd BufWritePre /etc/bind/db.* call ReplaceBindZoneSerialLine()
endfunction

Does the FSF need better top-down social skills?

Larry Cafiero and Joe Brockmeier are two big voices for technological freedom. They’re both pretty fired up about RMS’s f-you epitaph of Jobs.

Generally you want the figurehead of a public foundation to be, uh, attractive. Intellectually, maybe even physically. Right? Not only does the cause itself have to make sense, these people need to attract other people to their cause. And they usually “say the right things”, smile, wear a suit, whatever. But I always thought these requirements only applied to other causes (besides Free Software).

Certainly RMS lacking those traits didn’t keep me from FLOSS. I heard about RMS and the proprietary printer a while back, and that’s all it took to get me hooked on FLOSS. I could identify immediately because I write software, and proprietary code is a pain. His cause just makes sense, even if he doesn’t. But I’ve been justifying his abnormal behavior because, well, he started something new! Something important. He knew it was important, and dedicated his life to this thing that many, many folks never even know exists. Something that affects all our lives, every day, more and more. Software must support our Freedom, or we are not free.

So he won me over, but I’m a nerd. I’m used to eccentrics in my field. Truth wins, period. And I still don’t know if it matters if RMS is a polished, smiley, public-friendly dude or not. Would Free Software be farther along today if RMS were kinder, more respectful, or somehow a better “public figure”? Would DRM have never been allowed to exist? Would the government pass laws that software for implanted medical devices be Free?

Link Checker Wishlist

Link checkers spider through your website and make sure that links work. I want an awesome link checker. Ideally, it would espouse as many of these attributes as possible:

  • easy to learn
  • easy to configure/customize
    • example config: don’t hit URLs on other servers
  • sensible default behaviors
    • example: respects robots.txt and ‘nofollow’ link attributes
  • scriptable / embeddable
    • useful from command line
    • useful from within CI servers like Jenkins
  • recurses (parses HTML, follows links)
    • and smartly avoids checking the same pages twice
  • fast
  • thrifty with memory
  • pluggable
    • example plugin: run jslint on all JavaScript
    • example plugin: validate HTML 5
    • example plugin: validate CSS
    • example plugin: compute accessibility score
    • example plugin: JUnit XML output
    • example plugin: OpenDocument spreadsheet output
    • example plugin: Excel output
    • example plugin: CSV output
    • example plugin: JavaScript engine
    • example plugin: follow hashbang URLs
  • beautiful source code
  • FLOSS

offline HTML 5 validation

HTML 5 logo

I’m liking Henri Sivonen’s Validator.nu service. I’ve got it running locally, and it works well. I can use it as a web service and validate HTML from within Vim, using quickfix to rapidly resolve errors. My Jenkins CI server uses the same validator via phpunit tests.

Warning: it took me a very long time to get it running locally. Technically easy (just run a build script), but it downloads tons of libraries and files before it can do its job.